How to prevent children’s challenging behaviors in early childhood education

How to prevent children’s challenging behaviors in early childhood education

This blog post was contributed by Carla Peixoto (inED). Preschool teachers often worry about how to manage children’s challenging behaviors, such as throwing objects, disrupting other children’s activities, hitting, etc. While in some cases challenging behaviors are brief and easy

A horrid brat in class? The story of a 3-year-old child of parents with a mental illness

A horrid brat in class? The story of a 3-year-old child of parents with a mental illness

Once again Jip has hurt a child in the circle. For the third time in one week. While the teacher is reading aloud, Jip starts yelling, making it nearly impossible for the other children to follow the story. When teacher Jill tells the boy to stop shouting, he looks at her defiantly. “No, I won’t stop”, three-and-a-half-year-old Jip says in a self-assured way and he simply continues. In a mere couple of weeks, the toddler has turned into a badly-behaved child.

Difficult conversations with children

Difficult conversations with children

Some topics are difficult to talk about with children … – illnesses, accidents, death, violence. Most adults are afraid of taking up these themes with young children. However, as they are an inevitable part of life, each of us, including children, must get used to these issues. To help children become familiar with such topics, it’s worth showing them that you can talk about these difficult subjects. The only question is – how to do it?

‘That pencil is not flesh coloured. It’s brown’: talking about skin colours in the classroom

‘That pencil is not flesh coloured. It’s brown’: talking about skin colours in the classroom

Teacher, why is that girl so dirty? When young children make such statements, we are inclined to pass over them (‘she does not know what she is saying’), to blame the parents (‘they must have picked it up at home’) or to quickly and generally condemn these statements (‘you cannot say that, that is not nice’). We assume that children will grow up to be unprejudiced adults if we do not talk about ‘it’. Contrary to what we believe, young children are not ‘colour-blind’.