Cultural diversity and inclusiveness. How to ensure that every child belongs?

Cultural diversity and inclusiveness. How to ensure that every child belongs?

Every child wants to feel that they are seen and heard; that they belong. This applies to Dutch children and also, perhaps even more, to children from different cultural backgrounds or who speak a different language at home. How do you ensure that all children have the feeling that they belong in the group?

Moving on from special education… The Portuguese new legislation on inclusive education

Moving on from special education… The Portuguese new legislation on inclusive education

How should we organize inclusive education? This is a key question in many European countries as they move from special to inclusive education. We would like to introduce the new Portuguese law to you as an innovative and inspiring framework, and describe some motivations behind the law.

‘That pencil is not flesh coloured. It’s brown’: talking about skin colours in the classroom

‘That pencil is not flesh coloured. It’s brown’: talking about skin colours in the classroom

Teacher, why is that girl so dirty? When young children make such statements, we are inclined to pass over them (‘she does not know what she is saying’), to blame the parents (‘they must have picked it up at home’) or to quickly and generally condemn these statements (‘you cannot say that, that is not nice’). We assume that children will grow up to be unprejudiced adults if we do not talk about ‘it’. Contrary to what we believe, young children are not ‘colour-blind’.

I can always count on her. What migrant parents value in their relationships with the (pre)school.

I can always count on her.  What migrant parents value in their relationships with the (pre)school.

“When I have something on my mind, I just walk to the teacher. Yes, I’ll ask for suggestions like ‘how do I need to do these things at home? Do you have suggestions?’ Yes, I can always count on her..” – Batoul, parent of Dahbi (4 years old).