A horrid brat in class? The story of a 3-year-old child of parents with a mental illness

A horrid brat in class? The story of a 3-year-old child of parents with a mental illness

Once again Jip has hurt a child in the circle. For the third time in one week. While the teacher is reading aloud, Jip starts yelling, making it nearly impossible for the other children to follow the story. When teacher Jill tells the boy to stop shouting, he looks at her defiantly. “No, I won’t stop”, three-and-a-half-year-old Jip says in a self-assured way and he simply continues. In a mere couple of weeks, the toddler has turned into a badly-behaved child.

Innovations in ECEC do not always result in positive evidence. How should we deal with it?

Innovations in ECEC do not always result in positive evidence. How should we deal with it?

This blog post was contributed by Helena Taelman (ODISEE).    Educational professionals and researchers may build a nice innovation, grounded in the most recent insights of developmental and educational science. Nevertheless, it may not work as expected, since classrooms and schools

How come our preschoolers do not move enough? And what should we do?

How come our preschoolers do not move enough? And what should we do?

“Ooh, too little exercise? No, my preschoolers move more than enough and can hardly sit still!” This is how teacher Nathalie describes her 4-year-olds during my class visit. However… recent research in Flemish preschoolers reveals a completely different picture. Slightly less than 90% of the preschoolers do not reach the international guidelines for physical activity on weekdays.

‘That pencil is not flesh coloured. It’s brown’: talking about skin colours in the classroom

‘That pencil is not flesh coloured. It’s brown’: talking about skin colours in the classroom

Teacher, why is that girl so dirty? When young children make such statements, we are inclined to pass over them (‘she does not know what she is saying’), to blame the parents (‘they must have picked it up at home’) or to quickly and generally condemn these statements (‘you cannot say that, that is not nice’). We assume that children will grow up to be unprejudiced adults if we do not talk about ‘it’. Contrary to what we believe, young children are not ‘colour-blind’.

5 research-inspired tips to develop preschoolers’ language through conversation

Conversation is crucial for language acquisition, but talking in the home context is quite different from talking in an ECEC setting. I would like to share 5 tips to enrich those conversations. 1 The type of activity matters. “Language-all-day-long” is a beautiful goal to pursue. However, in practice what really matters is what you do (a.o. Cabell et al., 2014). Excellent contexts to produce rich, language stimulating conversations have been shown to be science activities and storytelling moments. Thus, focussing on these is a first great strategy for language development.

Increasing toddlers and preschoolers’ engagement in play: how does the teacher do that?

Increasing toddlers and preschoolers’ engagement in play: how does the teacher do that?

It’s Emma’s first day of teacher training in a nursery school. She quickly observes the classroom. Where do they need me? Emma is everywhere and nowhere in the classroom; she walks – no, she runs – from one corner to another and back. She wants all toddlers to receive all the attention they need at all times… However, is that possible? And more: is it necessary?